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Boston Borough Council adaopts street art policy after success of graffiti artists in Spalding





The work of two prominent street artists has proven so impressive that a neighbouring council is getting in on the act.

Graffiti artists Karl Barfoot (known as Honr) and Adam Sadd petitioned South Holland District Council for a street art wall in 2021.

Since then their work has taken off, with eyecatching designs seen around Spalding, most notably at the Castle Sports Complex, the St Paul’s skate park, their ‘wonderwall’ on the Westons Farm Supplies building and most recently in the town centre to brighten up the boarded-up former Calthrops Solicitors building in time for the flower parade.

Karl Barfoot and Adam Sadd work on the mural
Karl Barfoot and Adam Sadd work on the mural

It is hoped that more street art can be commissioned across South Holland.

On the back of their success, neighbouring Boston Borough Council has adopted a policy to welcome pre-approved street art into the town.

SHDC’s policy is now intended to be adopted across the South & East Lincolnshire Council Partnership sub-region, which also includes East Lindsey District Council.

Karl Barfoot and his tag name HONR. PHOTO: SUBMITTED
Karl Barfoot and his tag name HONR. PHOTO: SUBMITTED

Cabinet members from Boston Borough Council endorsed the policy during a meeting, hoping it could ‘brighten up’ the town and attract more tourists.

Coun Emma Cresswell, portfolio holder for communities, said she was ‘really excited by this policy’, especially its focus on engaging with schools and colleges.

Deputy leader Dale Broughton noted that this could also attract new sculptures, helping to create a ‘positive talking point’ for the town.

Street art at St Paul's skate park, also known as The Bloc
Street art at St Paul's skate park, also known as The Bloc

“This opens up the whole borough to a lot of things,” he said.

The new policy will see a planning-style application process for street art locations to be submitted to Boston Borough Council.

The stunning artwork created by Karl Barfoot and Adam Sadd to hide the graffiti tags sprayed onto the former Calthrops building in Market Place, Spalding
The stunning artwork created by Karl Barfoot and Adam Sadd to hide the graffiti tags sprayed onto the former Calthrops building in Market Place, Spalding

Property owners are urged to notify the council if they wish to retain existing graffiti as street art.

The council laid out a series of ‘key considerations’ for street art including whether it can be seen from public areas, whether it is offensive in nature (for example gang-related or racially, politically or religiously aggravating), whether the images are appropriate to the location and how many images are already present in the area.



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