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Environment Agency explains why the River Welland is at unusually low levels in Spalding





An explanation has been given for the unusually low levels of the River Welland in Spalding town centre.

The Environment Agency says that it has lowered the Welland as part of its work to help the Cowbit and Crowland Wash recover after a river bank collapsed following Storm Henk earlier this year.

Much of the farmland around the Cowbit and Crowland Wash still remains underwater after the swollen Welland flooded through a hole in the bank.

Traffic cones and other debris can be seen as the River Welland is at an unusually low level
Traffic cones and other debris can be seen as the River Welland is at an unusually low level

The river bed, along with a host of traffic cones and other debris, can be seen around High Bridge in Spalding town centre – which has prompted concerns about the wildlife.

A spokesperson for the Environment Agency said: “We have lowered the River Welland water levels below normal winter levels in the event of further rainfall. This is part of our recovery work at the Crowland and Cowbit Washes following the two breaches there during Storm Henk.

“Alongside Welland and Deepings Internal Drainage Board we had been making progress with draining the washes. However, the high flows on the washes set this back. Keeping the levels of the Welland low allows water to be discharged from Locks Mill Sluice.

The River Welland in Spalding was running at a high level in February
The River Welland in Spalding was running at a high level in February
The Environment Agency is keeping the River Welland at a low levels in Spalding
The Environment Agency is keeping the River Welland at a low levels in Spalding

“A reservoir engineer has carried out an inspection to determine what repair works are needed and designs are now in progress with our contractors. We are also looking at getting pumps back in to start draining down the washes in the next week.

“We are aiming to start permanent repair works in the upcoming weeks. Once breaches are fixed, we will continue to pump the surrounding fields.”

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