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Met Office issues amber warning across Lincolnshire as Storm Isha predicted to reach speeds of up to 80mph tonight





The Met Office has issued an amber warning – urging residents to be cautious as winds could reach up to 80mph this evening.

Storm Isha has led to warnings across the majority of the UK, including Lincolnshire and Rutland, with travel disruption and damage to buildings possible.

The public are also being warned of potential loss of power and phone signal.

The Met Office has issued an Amber Warning as Storm Isha is set to hit tonight
The Met Office has issued an Amber Warning as Storm Isha is set to hit tonight

The storm – which has predicted windspeeds of up to 80mph as well as heavy rain in areas – is expected to last between 6pm this evening (January 21) and 6am tomorrow morning.

“Storm Isha will bring a spell of very strong winds during Sunday evening and into Monday,” a Met Office statement read.

“Disruption to travel and utilities is likely.”

East Midlands Railway has released a statement saying travel disruptions are ‘likely’.

“EMR are working closely with Network Rail, monitoring the weather forecast and preparing to enable us to run a reliable service,” the statement read.

“We strongly recommend you check your full journey before travelling, and allow extra time to complete your journey as delays are likely on Sunday (21) and Monday (22).”

The met Office also warned what residents may expect from tonight’s gales.

These are:

A good chance that power cuts may occur, with the potential to affect other services, such as mobile phone coverage.

Potential damage to buildings, such as tiles blown from roofs.

Longer journey times and cancellations likely, as road, rail, air and ferry services may be affected.

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Some roads and bridges may be likely to close.

Injuries and danger to life is likely from large waves and beach material being thrown onto coastal roads, sea fronts and properties.



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