Home   Stamford   News   Article

Subscribe Now

Stamford, Rutland, Bourne and the Deepings news from 10, 25, 50, 100, 150 and 200 years ago





We’re on our weekly stroll down memory lane looking at news from up to 200 years ago.

Our Rutland & Stamford Mercury Memories is produced thanks to the support of the Stamford Mercury Archive Trust.

10 years ago

Could this pub be the county’s number one music venue?

A pub hopes to become the county's number one live music venue after winning £10,000 in a national competition. The Railway Inn, Oakham, beat scores of other pubs from across the UK in the Music Makeover competition, run by copyright campaign group PRS for Music.

Shaun and Helen Jackson at the Railway Inn, Oakham, 10 years ago.
Shaun and Helen Jackson at the Railway Inn, Oakham, 10 years ago.

The pub will now get the chance to work with the Musicians Union, The British Bar and Pub Association and music equipment supplier GAK to become the live music destination for Rutland.

Railway Inn owner Shaun Jackson was delighted to have won the competition. He added: “It was really a case of ‘let’s try it and see what happens’.

“We knew we had a good argument. There’s a heck of a lot of talented musicians around here.”

The competition featured several stages, including regional heats. Organisers visited the Railway Inn and did a video interview with Shaun. The pub has a large function room which Shaun has been trying to turn into a gig venue since he took over.

“He said: “The organisers were surprised by the size of the room we have got. They said they like our approach to supporting local music.”

And having won the £10,000 prizes, Shaun is determined to promote Rutland talent whenever he can.

He said: “There is so much around here at a grassroots level. Our intention is to equip the room out and let local bands use it free of charge for practice space.”

Care home gets much-needed makeover

Jasmine Lounge at Whitefriars Care Home has had a much needed makeover.

Staff at Whitefriars Care Home 10 years ago.
Staff at Whitefriars Care Home 10 years ago.

A team from the Lions Club of Stamford joined staff at the care home in the town's St George's Avenue, to sand down the walls, put up new wallpaper and paint the walls to make the room a more cheerful place for patients with dementia who use it.

Starting at 10pm the two teams worked through the night, including re-arranging all furniture, to create a more friendly atmosphere, and completed the task by 5am the next day.

The £1,000 needed for sprucing up the Jasmine Lounge in the 56-bed residential home for dementia patients, including a 20-bed secure unit for those with severe dementia, came from the Stamford branch of the Norwich and Peterborough Building Society.

Carer Sarah Turner-Daffern said: "They completely redecorated it. We're very grateful for the money and the help. The lounge looks really nice now."

Scouts celebrate St George’s Day

Over 350 scouts and their leaders marched through Stamford on Sunday to celebrate St George’s Day. The parade formed at the west end of the High Street and marched along the High Street, up Star Lane and onto Broad Street.

The salute was taken at Brownes Hospital, where the district president Miranda Rock was joined by deputy county commissioner Ray Dennis, the mayor of Stamford Brian Sumner, the parade organiser Peter Ellis and district chairman Greg Cejer.

Chris Jackson with his awards 10 years ago. Also pictured are Georgina and Harry Jackson, Trevor Watson, Ray Dennis and Greg Cejer.
Chris Jackson with his awards 10 years ago. Also pictured are Georgina and Harry Jackson, Trevor Watson, Ray Dennis and Greg Cejer.

Eleven groups from across the district attended the parade, which was held for the first time in Stamford in a number of years.

The parade finished at All Saints’ Church where the St George’s Day service was led by the Very Rev Mark Warrick, Dean of Stamford.

The district commissioner for Stamford and Bourne Trevor Watson open the service with prayers, followed by readings given by explorer scouts. Jane Hockey and Philip Tokens were given wood badges in recognition of them completing their training as leaders in the district.

Students put questions to councillors

Iconic radio show Any Questions hosted by Jonathan Dimbleby was broadcast live from a local college on Friday, April 25, Casterton Business and Enterprise College was delighted to host the popular Radio 4 programme.

The audience at the Any Questions show 10 years ago.
The audience at the Any Questions show 10 years ago.
Broadcaster Johnathan Dimbleby leads the discussion 10 years ago.
Broadcaster Johnathan Dimbleby leads the discussion 10 years ago.

This is a radio version of the BBC One TV programme Question Time.

The programme went out live on Friday night with questions from the audience and was repeated on Saturday lunchtime.

The event was attended by members of the local political parties and Rutland County Council, as well as staff and parents from Casterton Business and Enterprise College and Rutland County College.

The audience submitted the questions as they arrived and questions were chosen by the production team, then asked by the person who had posed the question.

Questions were asked on a range of topics including zero hours contracts, UKIP, wind farms and Rutland.

The panel included Grant Shapps (Conservative Party chairman), Dan Jarvis (Shadow Justice), Baroness Grender (Lib Dem communications) and Tim Aker (UKIP Head of Policy). The programme was chaired by Jonathan Dimbleby.

Two students who are taking A-level Media Studies at Rutland County College were invited to 'shadow' the production team from set up through to the end of the programme.

Teacher Dave Bower said: "This was a great opportunity for Chloe and Charlotte to see the programme actually in production."

Slimmers beat weight loss targets for charity

A group of slimmers set themselves six-week weight loss targets in a bid to shed the pounds in aid of a day centre.

Joan Klincke, group leader Ann Gammage, Butterfield Centre manager Debbie Hague and Sharon Wass 10 years ago.
Joan Klincke, group leader Ann Gammage, Butterfield Centre manager Debbie Hague and Sharon Wass 10 years ago.

Eight members of the Bourne Slimming World group took part in a sponsored slim to raise money for the Butterfield Centre.

They asked their fellow members for sponsorship and over the six-week timespan lose between 6lb and 4st.

Overall the whole group, comprising about 140 people, lost a combined total of more than 50st.

And thanks to the generosity of those who did not take part in the sponsored slim the group made a total of £570, which was handed over to the Butterfield Centre.

Group leader Ann Gammage said: “The members were keen to get involved and they all did really well with their sponsorship money.”

Butterfield manager Debbie Hague added: “We are thrilled.

“It’s nice for community groups to get involved in helping us.”

25 years ago

School gets Royal seal of approval

The royal seal of approval has been given to the new maths block, music suite, and drama studio opened by the Duchess of Gloucester at the Deepings School.

Deepings headteacher David Bryars introduces the Duchess to pupils 25 years ago.
Deepings headteacher David Bryars introduces the Duchess to pupils 25 years ago.
A Japanese greeting for the Duchess of Gloucester 25 years ago.
A Japanese greeting for the Duchess of Gloucester 25 years ago.

Headteacher David Bryars said: “The pupils’ response has been fantastic. The new facilities are a huge improvement. The old drama studio, for example, was a converted shower room which made it pretty dark and dank but our new one has excellent acoustics and lighting and is very versatile. The students love it.”

Jennie Rea, chairman of school governors, added: “The new facilities were 10 years in the making. We wanted to build the best for our pupils and we’re delighted at the results.”

Many of the pupils who met the Duchess during her visit said she was friendly, sincere, and very approachable.

Stacey Hulls (11), who gave the Duchess a posy of flowers, said: “I was really nervous beforehand but the Duchess was really nice.”

Year 10 students Charlotte Ruddy, Clare Pike, Felicity Humphries and Nicola Glossop said the Duchess chatted to them about their school coursework and future plans.

Playgroup praised for work

A town playgroup has been praised by the Office for Standards in Education in a recent report.

Big smiles from children and staff at the Meadowview Playgroup 25 years ago.
Big smiles from children and staff at the Meadowview Playgroup 25 years ago.

Meadowview Playgroup, in Drift Road, Stamford, was commended for providing a good balance of different activities and providing a safe and secure environment for children.

The educational programme at the playgroup was described as good in five of six key areas and satisfactory in the other.

The report said: “The quality of teaching is good. The staff are confident and work together are a very effective team.”

The report detailed one weakness. It stated: “There is too little emphasis placed upon discovery, recognition of the properties of living and manufactured things and working out why things happen.”

Johanna Short, playgroup proprietor, said: “We are obviously delighted with our Ofsted report, which the inspector described as ‘very strong’.

“Yet, we are not going to rest on our laurels. We are constantly looking at ways to improve the playgroup.”

Pub praised for quality of ales

The Five Horse Shoes pub in Barholm has been awarded the Cask Marque for the quality of its ales.

Paul Whitehouse, of the Five Horse Shoes pub in Barholm, is joined by John Watchorn, of Adnams Brewery after receiving his award 25 years ago.
Paul Whitehouse, of the Five Horse Shoes pub in Barholm, is joined by John Watchorn, of Adnams Brewery after receiving his award 25 years ago.

Run by landlord Paul Whitehouse since last January, the Five Horse Shoes is one of the few pubs in Mercury Country which has achieved the accreditation.

Paul received two unannounced visits from Cask Marque assessors and scored very highly each time. "I don't serve food here - 1 just like to concentrate on the ales," he said. But more hard work is going to follow.

"I’ll be facing two more tests from Cask Marque every year to make sure I'm maintaining the stan-dard," he added.

John Watchorn, of Adnams Brewery, said: "It is a fantastic achievement by Paul. Cask Marque accreditations do not come easy. The Five Horse Shoes - which serves beers such as Adnams, Fuller's London Pride, and Elgoods Golden Newt - follows the Daniel Lambert pub in Stamford which also received the Cask Marque accreditation earlier this year.

50 years ago

Elderly people in Woodnewton got a May Day treat on Wednesday, when children from the village primary school visited their homes and sang May songs.

It was all part of the May Day celebrations of the Woodnewton Church of England Primary School, and the traditional walk around the village began after the school May Queen, nine-year-old Sally Pettit, had been crowned.

100 years ago

Medals for Whist - At the White Hart Inn on Friday, the Mayor (Mr A. Cliff) presented the cup to the Whitefriars Whist Club, winners of the Stamford Whist League. As captain, Mr T. Clay, received the trophy. The Mayor also presented medals to the team and to the runners-up (the Liberal Club). The cup was twice filled by the Mayor with whisky and lemonade. A convivial evening followed, when Mr J. Johnson presided.

150 years ago

A conflagration was caused at Whitwell on Monday by a child playing with matches.

About two o'clock a straw stack belonging to Mr. John Clarke, consisting of the produce of 11 acres, was in flames; and the fire soon extended to a stack of hay and clover on the adjoining premises of Mr. Robert Pinder.

A waggon belonging to Mr. Clarke was also destroyed. The engine from Empingham was in attendance, a stream of water ran through the yard, and plenty of help was at hand.

200 years ago

To the editor of the Mercury. Sir,—I beg leave, through the medium of your paper, to call the attention of the public (particularly the inhabitants of Sleaford) to an existing calamity which seems to require a degree of authoritative influence to interpose a preventive.

I allude to the smallpox which is now so prevalent at Sleaford.

It is truly melancholy to witness the daily scenes of mortality occasioned by this dreadful disorder.

The lower orders of the people, either through poverty or a mistaken prejudice, neglect to use the proper means of safety, and thus suffer their children to fall untimely victims, without having recourse to either vaccination or inoculation. Within the last three weeks, a very fearful number have been prematurely swept off, and no effort has yet been made to allay the violence of the contagion. Surely, sir, such a source of misery has a strong claim on public sympathetic feeling and interference.



This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies - Learn More