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Stamford, Rutland, Bourne and the Deepings news from 10, 25, 50, 100, 150 and 200 years ago





We’re on our weekly stroll down memory lane looking at news from up to 200 years ago.

Our Rutland & Stamford Mercury Memories is produced thanks to the support of the Stamford Mercury Archive Trust.

10 years ago

Excitement builds for summer event

Excitement is building for Rutland’s event of the summer.
The 182nd Rutland County Show is taking place at its new home at the recently opened showground near the Oakham bypass on June 1.

The Rutland Show returned for the 182nd time 10 years ago.
The Rutland Show returned for the 182nd time 10 years ago.

The event promises to be a great day for the whole family, showcasing the best of what the county has to offer.

There will be more than 150 cattle, 200 sheep and 100 goats competing in various categories.

Trade stands, food vendors and children’s activities will feature as well as wildlife, including birds of prey, and an array of classic cars and tractors.

There will also be a demonstration from the RAVC Military dogs from Melton Mowbray, where visitors will get to see how the dogs are trained for a variety of roles including protection and search.

Number one fan continues to shows spirit

Stamford AFC's number one fan is celebrating after chalking up 400 consecutive games of watching his beloved club.

Giles Lawrence (right) with his granddaughter Gabby 10 years ago.
Giles Lawrence (right) with his granddaughter Gabby 10 years ago.

Stamford superfan Giles ‘Stampy' Lawrence closed the season on a total 405 consecutive games supporting the Daniels, a run that dates tack to August 2007 - a game at Lincoln United, where the team were beaten 4-0.

Giles, who is affectionately known as Stampy due to his job as a machine operator at the Royal Mail in Peterborough, began his love affair with the club after a colleague suggested he watch a game as a match involving Northampton Town was called off.

The 42-year-old soon got the bug for the Daniels and switched his allegiance to the Kettering Road club.

And Giles commitment goes much further than just cheering on the team from the terraces. As well as editing the club's website, he regularly takes players to games alongside the

team kit, and is the assistant manager of the Under 14s. He was given the perfect reward for reaching his milestone, as the youngsters he coaches won this year's Hereward League Cup. Giles said: "I'm very proud to have reached 400 games, even though sometimes I think I may need my head looking at.

"It is the sheer enjoyment of going to a non-league game, and I find the opposition fans a lot friendlier than league fans.”

Money raised for life-saving defib

Market Overton residents now have access to a lifesaving defibrillator thanks to the generous support of The Karen Ball Fund, The Lions Club, and the Catmose, and Rutland Lodges of Freemasons.

Members of Market Overton Parish Council from left, Robin Marlow, Andrew Stewart, Barbie Jenkins, Stuart Sanderson and Helen Buff, with the new defib 10 years ago.
Members of Market Overton Parish Council from left, Robin Marlow, Andrew Stewart, Barbie Jenkins, Stuart Sanderson and Helen Buff, with the new defib 10 years ago.

The charitable donations covered more than three quarters of the £2,000 cost to purchase and install the kit, with the rest being met by Market Overton Parish Council.

The life-saving device is housed in a bright yellow box, next to the village shop.

Andrew Stewart, chairman of the parish council, said: "Everyone in Market Overton, as well as all of the surrounding villages, would be able to benefit from the defibrillator, should they need it.

"By housing it right next to our popular village shop we hope that it will stay firmly lodged in people's minds.

"Obviously, we hope that it won't be needed, but the community can now rest assured that there is help close to hand, should it ever be required."

Summer event is rebranded

Stamford will come alive with a mix of music, entertainment, food and drink at the town council's rebranded summer event. The former Stamford Feast and Party on the Point has this year become Stamford Fayre, and will take place on the Meadows on Sunday, June 1.

A family enjoying Stamford Summer Fayre 10 years ago.
A family enjoying Stamford Summer Fayre 10 years ago.

Stamford town councillors have been busy organising a packed programme of activities to give the whole family a free event to enjoy.

Coun Maxine Couch (Independent) is deputy chairman of the council's events committee. She said the event had been renamed to give it an all-encompassing feel.

"This event will now incorporate craft stalls as well as a variety of food stalls," she added. "We would like to welcome back the Punch and Judy show, which will have three. performances throughout the day.

"Tatty Bumpkins will be there to entertain children with stories, yoga and activities during the day. "Our regular face painting stall will also be attending. "As well as the children's entertainment we will have!”

Couple to tackle hike for charity

Di and Peter Wheatley, from Market Deeping, will travel to Iceland in July for a gruelling hike in aid of Macmillan Cancer Support.

Peter Wheatley (left) and Di Wheatley (right) 10 years ago.
Peter Wheatley (left) and Di Wheatley (right) 10 years ago.

The couple, who regularly raise funds for the charity, will trek around the active volcano Mount Hekla.

25 years ago

Pupils learn engineering skills

Pupils from a school in Mercury Country have been learning the skills of engineering while having fun.

Adam Horn and Shaun Walker, Georgina Wood and Paul Lee and David Morris with Jeff Tyson from Castle Cement 25 years ago.
Adam Horn and Shaun Walker, Georgina Wood and Paul Lee and David Morris with Jeff Tyson from Castle Cement 25 years ago.

Children attending Ryhall Primary School took part in the Junior Engineers for Schools competition which was judged on May 12.

Working alone or in pairs, the youngsters designed aircraft which could be built from K'nex construction kits.

Before the competition they drew up plans and refined their designs, which had to be built on the day in under one hour.

Jan Williams, headteacher, said: "The children really enjoyed it. We had to prise them away from practising. The box of K'nex will now spend a week at a time in each class so everyone gets a go."

The competition was judged by Jeff Tyson, a maintenance engineer from Castle Cement in Ketton. The winning entry from Year 5 pupils, Paul Lee and David Morris, was photographed and these may net them a place in a regional final which could lead to a national com-petition.

Their K'nex 'plane was about a yard wide and was made from hundreds of pieces.

Dancers and singers ready to wow audiences

After months of planning and rehearsals, the Essential Clothes Show hits Stamford Theatre on Thursday, May 27, for an evening of singing, dancing, and catwalk strutting to benefit the charity Hope and Homes for Children.

Model Melissa Gudgeon, biker Steve Tebbs, Di Kaye and girls from the Welland School of Dancing 25 years ago.
Model Melissa Gudgeon, biker Steve Tebbs, Di Kaye and girls from the Welland School of Dancing 25 years ago.

Sponsored by Burghley Estates, the evening promises to be a night of entertainment to remember by those who go along to see it.

Organiser Di Kaye said: "It's all systems go now. We've got the models, the clothes, the music and the routines and everybody is ready to lay on a fabulous show.

“There will also be a few surprises lined up along the way for the audience."

The night includes a number from Elvis impersonator Clive Hankers, input from a local biker complete with a Harley Davidson, and performances from pupils at the Welland School of Dancing Di added: "I’ve always been fascinated by musicals and spectaculars and this has been in my mind right through the preparations. I wanted something not only showy but slick."

Fond farewell to Scout leader

Corby Glen cubs and scouts said a fond farewell to group leader Michael Newman who retired this week.

Michael Newman receives a certificate to mark his retirement from Corby Glen scouts 25 years ago.
Michael Newman receives a certificate to mark his retirement from Corby Glen scouts 25 years ago.

Michael (66) of Bryony Gar-dens, Bourne, has spent the last five years with the Corby Glen division organising activities such as camping, canoeing, map reading and a host of other challenges for the cubs and scouts.

Robert Rose, one of the adult leaders of the Corby Glen group said: “Michael’s commitment and dedication has been there for all to see.

“He is admired by everyone in the scouting movement and will be a hard man to replace.

“He came at a time when the group was desperate for a warranted scout leader.

“If he hadn’t come when he did, the whole group may have folded. In a rural area like this where boys do not have much in the way of things to do, that would have been a really bad loss.”

Young girl’s dream comes true

Every young girls dreams of being Queen for a day and this week Caroline Tory's dream came true.

Caroline Tory, the 1999 Deepings Carnival Queen eith her attendants Jenny Smith and Jake Fisher 25 years ago.
Caroline Tory, the 1999 Deepings Carnival Queen eith her attendants Jenny Smith and Jake Fisher 25 years ago.

Eleven-year-old Caroline, of Market Deeping, was crowned this year's Deeping Carnival Queen at the annual Search for a Queen competition. Caroline was said to be overjoyed to win the competition which was sponsored by Delaine buses.

The competition attracted 17 entrants ranging from five to 14 years of age.

The winner was presented with £100 from Delaine Buses.

Carnival secretary Carolyn Mutter said: "Caroline seemed overjoyed to win the competition. "She was a little nervous at first but soon got into the swing of things."

And Caroline will be joined in her carnival Queen duties by attendants Jenny Smith (7) of Deeping St James and Jake Fisher (6) also of Market Deeping.

They were also chosen on the night of the competition. The girls were presented with a bouquet each which had been donated by Riverside Florists, a sponsor of the carnival for the past five years.

Tutoring business continues to thrive

Any parent will tell you that the education of their children is a major concern. But what happens if a child is unhappy at school and is not making progress compared to the rest of the class.

Staff at Stepping Stones Tuition 25 years ago.
Staff at Stepping Stones Tuition 25 years ago.

The answer could be employing a home tutor, and the Stepping Stones Tuition' agency, based in a converted Stamford council house in Masterton Road, has grown into a leading UK company in this field.

Run by husband and wife team Clive and Damaris West, Stepping Stones now has tutors throughout England, Scotland and Wales giving a range of education based services including one-to-one teaching of children in their own homes.

Clive said: "We hear from parents every day whose children are having problems at failing schools. Most of them don't know which way to turn. They feel confused and alone. But they are definitely not alone and in many cases there is a lot we can do to help."

Stepping Stones is able to teach art, academic, and music subjects such as maths, English, Spanish, geography, and French.

It has more than 1,500 tutors on its books - all of whom are carefully vetted - and arranges over 35,000 lessons every year. Clive added: "When a parent calls us, we go about finding a suitable tutor for the child. There are no easy fixes, but if the tutors, parents and children work together and show commitment, we can get some great results."

50 years ago

Tiny, a 14-year-old mongrel bitch, is a friendly little animal, but, says her owner, Mrs Sheila Farmer, "she's afraid of nothing."

And that nearly proved her wood on Monday undoing when she took off after a fox in Stoke Wood and finished up trapped in a badger’s set for nearly a week.

100 years ago

Street Mishap - About 9.30 on Saturday evening a collision ensued in St. Peter's Street between a motor car driven by Mr. Alfred E. Clarke, Maiden-lane, plumber, and Mr. Robert Whittaker, a roadman, of Collyweston, who was riding a cycle.

The last-named received injury to the face, and was taken to the Infirmary, but after treatment was able to proceed home.

150 years ago

Restoration and Re-opening of the Church at Witham-on-the-Hill. — This village is one of the prettiest in South Lincolnshire, and its elevated church and churchyard command a charmingly picturesque prospect.

The venerable and interesting church, dedicated in honour of St. Andrew, consists of some ancient features, but none of these belonged to the first church known to have existed here before the Conquest.

The oldest relic is the font, having an octagonal bowl, on one panel of which is a patriarchal cross: this is of an early Norman period.

200 years ago

Seaton most respectfully informs his friends and the public that his Son, J. T. SEATON, has just returned from London, &c., where he has been for the express purpose (under one of the first master cutters) of learning the art of cutting out gentlemen's clothes in the first style of fashion to fit the human shape; and having accomplished his object, J. S. has commenced making up every description of clothing upon his own premises.



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