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Rock On Records, in Stamford, to launch sale of 5p and 10p stock after flood hits owner’s Ketton home in Rutland





Thousands of vinyl records are to be sold for 10 pence or less after unprecedented flooding hit the home of a record shop owner.

Rock On Records was opened in Stamford last year by former Thin Lizzy manager Ted Carroll as a means to clear out his huge archive of vinyl, with all profits going to charities.

But when last Friday’s torrential rain flooded the cellar of his Ketton home, as the River Chater burst its banks, thousands of record sleeves were ruined, including around 800 albums and 12 inches.

The vinyl records can still be played, but the sleeves are ruined
The vinyl records can still be played, but the sleeves are ruined

From tomorrow (Saturday), the All Saints Street shop will begin selling off the records, many of which have never been played, from artists including Elvis Presley, Motorhead, The Damned, Madness, Frank Sinatra, Madonna, Aretha Franklin, and Marvin Gaye.

“Water does not damage vinyl, however record sleeves after being submerged in water are history and have to be thrown away,” said Ted.

“About 2,500 seven-inch singles have been damaged so we will sell them off cheap for 5p or 10p, and albums will be a pound or whatever we can get for them.”

Ted Carroll opened Rock On Records in Stamford in March
Ted Carroll opened Rock On Records in Stamford in March

The Chater sits at the bottom of their garden, and Ted and wife Josette have become used to flooding since moving into the former water mill around 30 years ago.

Indeed Ted, who used to run the Rock On record label and its iconic shops in London, lost about £10,000 of rare vinyl soon after moving in, and since then belongings have been stored high on shelving in the cellar.

However, they were caught out last Friday when the floodwater reached to almost three feet, also putting their central heating boiler out of action.

Records were stacked away from ground level, but floodwater reached new heights
Records were stacked away from ground level, but floodwater reached new heights

None of Ted’s bespoke collection of high value, rare records was affected this time, but he estimates the value of proceeds lost, which had been destined for charity, at between £6,000 and £8,000.

“It tends to flood every two, three or four years,” Ted explained.

“The water we get comes through an inspection hatch in the cellar and it’s spring water which backs up.

Around 2,500 singles and up to 800 albums were affected
Around 2,500 singles and up to 800 albums were affected

“Around 15 or 20 years ago we had a really bad flood and we thought ‘it will never get higher than this’, but this time it went two inches higher still.

“I had been down there on Friday afternoon and moved some things to higher shelves and I was pretty sure everything was going to be okay.”

Ted has already made a number of donations to selected charities, including Medicins San Frontieres and Unicef, and is also supporting Stamford man Jack Bon Holly in his volunteer role as a humanitarian aid worker at the front line in Ukraine.

The shop has given out around £7,500 in total so far, with another £5,000 set to be donated.

Proceeds should soon rise sharply again after Ted unearthed a rare album by Mexican heavy metal band Megaton among a collection brought to the shop just a few weeks ago.

“We think it’s probably going to get £1,000 at auction and could go up to £2,000,” he said.

“The shop is doing well. We are getting people from all over the place which is fantastic, and people are bringing in their own records, although I did open the shop to get rid of my own stuff!”



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