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The price of a TV licence will increase from April 1, 2024





The price of a TV licence is going up.

In the first increase since April 2021, the Department for Culture, Media and Sport is preparing to rise charges by more than £10 for a standard permit and here’s all you need to know about the change…

The price of a TV licence is increasing in April. Picture: TV Licensing.
The price of a TV licence is increasing in April. Picture: TV Licensing.

Why the price rise?

The price of a TV licence is set by the government, which announced last December its plans for a price rise.

Increases have been calculated using an inflation figure of 6.7%, which was the Consumer Prices Index measure of inflation for the year up to September 2023.

Speaking at the time of the announcement, Culture Secretary Lucy Frazer said the increase ‘provides value for money for the licence fee payer while also ensuring that the BBC can continue to produce world leading content’.

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The BBC’s director general Tim Davie has this week committed to exploring how the fee could be ‘reformed’ in the future.

In his speech the head of the corporation pledged to look at ways of making the charge more affordable to lower income households after 2028 and how rules are applied and enforced.

The new charge will be £169.50. Image: iStock.
The new charge will be £169.50. Image: iStock.

What are the new charges?

The cost of an annual standard colour TV licence will rise to £169.50 on April 1 this year.

This is a rise of £10.50 on the current price of £159.

The cost of a TV licence for a black and white set – still watched by more than 4,000 UK households according to figures released in 2022 – will rise from £53.50 to £57 from April 1.

Discounts are available for some. Image: AdobeStock image.
Discounts are available for some. Image: AdobeStock image.

Who can get a free or discounted TV licence?

All over 75s used to be able to get a free TV licence but this was scrapped in 2020.

Those who are blind – or whose vision is severely impaired – are eligible to apply for a 50% discount.

From April 1 this would make their charge £84.75, which is an increase of just over £5 on the current charge of £79.50.

People living in residential care homes, supported housing or sheltered accommodation may also be entitled to a reduced fee.

If you’re aged 75 or over, you can get a free TV licence if you either get Pension Credit or live with a partner who is able to claim Pension Credit.



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