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Easter traffic to peak Saturday, says the AA, which is asking drivers to use what3words in a breakdown





Drivers are being warned to expect long delays on the road this Easter as more than 18 million car trips are anticipated on the first bank holiday weekend of the year.

Easter Saturday, says the AA, is expected to be the busiest day for holiday travel as millions of people set-off to join family and friends.

The AA says it expects millions more drivers on the roads this weekend. Image: Stock photo.
The AA says it expects millions more drivers on the roads this weekend. Image: Stock photo.

With unsettled weather forecast and millions more cars expected on the roads, the breakdown organisation is warning drivers to take extra care and prepare for the likelihood of delays.

This includes packing essential items such as water, warm clothes, extra charge for devices and additional food and drink as well as carrying out vehicle checks on things like tyre treads and pressure before setting off.

In contrast to Saturday’s mass getaway – Easter Sunday and Easter Monday are predicted to be the two quieter days of the four-day weekend.

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Easter Sunday also sees the clocks go forward by an hour as the UK switches to British Summer Time.

Drivers are being warned to expect delays. Image: iStock.
Drivers are being warned to expect delays. Image: iStock.

Chris Wood from the AA said: “Easter is the first opportunity many people have to go and see their family and we’re expecting the roads to be busy. Before setting off on a long journey it’s important to check your car. A few simple checks could stop car trouble from upsetting your plans.

“If driving in wet weather, try to avoid standing water where safe to do so as this can cover potholes or displaced inspection covers that may be lurking below the surface.”

With breakdown patrols expected to be in high demand the AA says increasing numbers of its members are now turning to what3words to identify their location when their car breaks down, which in turn can speed up their rescue.

In a breakdown, the AA is advising stranded drivers to use what3words to pinpoint their location. Image: Stock photo.
In a breakdown, the AA is advising stranded drivers to use what3words to pinpoint their location. Image: Stock photo.

The system, it says, is the ‘easiest way to describe a precise location’ with the world divided into three metre squares and each given a unique code made from three words. The app is free to download from your device’s app store.

Chris Sheldrick, Co-Founder and CEO of what3words, added: “Thousands of people will be packing their cars this week and travelling across the country to make the most of the long Easter weekend. This surge in traffic can cause chaos on the roads and highlights the importance of being prepared in case of a breakdown.

“Utilising what3words means the AA and emergency services can pinpoint your exact location if you find yourself in trouble, getting you off the hard shoulder and onto celebrations as quickly as possible.”



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