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Stamford, Rutland, Bourne and the Deepings news from 10, 25, 50, 100, 150 and 200 years ago





We’re once again off on our weekly stroll down memory lane looking at news from up to 200 years ago.

Our Mercury Memories is produced thanks to the support of the Stamford Mercury Archive Trust.

25 years ago: November 27, 1998 – Angry pensioners, from left, Ena Bannister, Eileen Dunford, Eleanor Slater, Phyllis Anniss and Jeff Riley who have to dig deep to fund their own TV licences following a reform of warden services.
25 years ago: November 27, 1998 – Angry pensioners, from left, Ena Bannister, Eileen Dunford, Eleanor Slater, Phyllis Anniss and Jeff Riley who have to dig deep to fund their own TV licences following a reform of warden services.

10 years ago

November 22, 2013

The community has jumped into action to raise money for people affected by Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines.

The Disasters Emergency Committee, which brings together 14 major charities, launched an appeal on Tuesday last week and has raised more than £50m.

Groups and individuals in Stamford, the Deepings and Bourne have jumped into action to support the victims.

Stamford Morrisons manager Nigel Walters, who was caught up in the typhoon while on holiday, launched a collection at the store and has raised about £1,500.

He hopes to raise £3,000 by next week.

Nigel said: “I'm really proud of the British people and their reaction to the appeal.

A Stamford street artist raised £2,500 for the typhoon appeal by selling prints of his work.

Nik Ellis, who paints under the name Snik, hosted a week-long sale of his piece Winged Fire to support the appeal.

Nik, who lives in Stamford, said: “After seeing the devastation that Typhoon Haiyan caused, I launched the sale to do something to help.”

The Mission Committee at the Priory Church in Deeping St James raised £500 on Saturday by staging a well attended Old Time Music Hall event at the Priory Church Hall.

Members of the Rotary Club of Bourne St Peter together with some members and organisers from Not All Bad Youth Centre became bag packers for the day in Tesco, in South Road, Bourne, on Saturday, raising £732.49, to be split between Shelterbox and local causes.

50 years ago: November 30, 1973 – Numerous children kept Father Christmas busy during one of Bourne's most popular pre-Christmas events, the Catholic bazaar, held in the Corn Exchange on Saturday.
50 years ago: November 30, 1973 – Numerous children kept Father Christmas busy during one of Bourne's most popular pre-Christmas events, the Catholic bazaar, held in the Corn Exchange on Saturday.

Trustees of a theatre are hoping to find new tenants for a space at Stamford Corn Exchange to generate much needed income.

The downstairs area of the Broad Street theatre is soon to be vacated by Sukies Party Emporium, which has opened new premises in North Street.

The business had been trading from the building for five years and the rent it paid provided valuable funds for the theatre.

The trustees do not want to see the 2,600 sq ft space empty for too long and say there are many possible uses.

They say it could be used as an antique or craft centre, or by traders as a Victorian-style shopping street or by a dance school.

Managing trustee Mick Lee said: “We have been left with a retail area which it is difficult to know what to do with. It's quite a large area and before we took it over it use to home an antiques centre.

“There were a lot of little stalls run by different people. That's what we think it might become.”

50 years ago: November 23, 1973 – A customer, Mrs M. Wood, registers her dismay at the sign at Northfield's garage, Stamford.
50 years ago: November 23, 1973 – A customer, Mrs M. Wood, registers her dismay at the sign at Northfield's garage, Stamford.

The partial closure of a busy road to replace gas pipes will wreak havoc with peak time traffic, a councillor has warned.

The lack of advance warning for motorists from National Grid about lane closures on the A1175 at Tallington – a main thoroughfare with a level crossing – for three weeks from Monday, will compound the congestion according to chairman of Tallington Parish Council Geoff Mayling.

“Apart from a very brief and uninformative public notice in the Mercury, there's been little attempt to let people know the details,” he said.

All 150 household in Tallington and hundred of motorists from surrounding villages will be affected.

“Works of this nature are planned well ahead yet National Grid did not consult about local concerns.”

The utility firm said it will make “every effort to minimise inconvenience to residents”.

25 years ago: November 27, 1998 – Year seven pupils at Queen Eleanor School, Stamford, with some of the castles they made as part of a competition linked to their history lessons.
25 years ago: November 27, 1998 – Year seven pupils at Queen Eleanor School, Stamford, with some of the castles they made as part of a competition linked to their history lessons.

25 years ago

November 20, 1998

Since the start of the year, Ted Stimson has been afraid to leave home in case his house floods.

Mr Stimson, 73, has bailed water from his front step eight or nine times this year in an effort to prevent rising rainwater from coming into his hallway.

He said: “We just can't go out – we daren't leave the property if it rains. We haven't even had a holiday this year, we are prisoners in our own home.

“The problem is so bad that, when it rains, the water is literally running uphill.”

The problem for the Peakirk pensioner is caused by rain water, which should flow into Peakirk Waterfowl Gardens, backing up along sewers and storm drains and flooding Mr Stimson's front garden.

Sluice gates at the waterfowl gardens have been opened, to allow excess water to flow more freely, and Peterborough City Council has said it will install non-return valves to control the flow of water. But as yet a permanent solution hasn't been found.

Mr Stimson said: “I am not happy, not very happy at all. I have had to bail out my garden eight or nine times this year, which is eight or nine times too many.

“It wouldn't be so bad if I was 23, but I'm not – I'm 73.”

25 years ago: November 20, 1998 – Parents see what goes on in the classrooms at Bourne Abbey Primary School open day.
25 years ago: November 20, 1998 – Parents see what goes on in the classrooms at Bourne Abbey Primary School open day.

Bourne's Christmas spirit is set to help refugees, the elderly and the young – thanks to two charity missions to Eastern Europe.

Food, toys and toiletries are to be ferried across the continent by local people – including town police chief Insp Paul Elliott.

A collection organised by the town's Lions' Ladies group has resulted in 117 parcels being wrapped up to go to Romania for residents of an old people's home.

Meanwhile, two members of Bourne Rotary Club plan to drop off a truckload of supplies at a church mission and refugee camp in Hungary.

The truck will be driven by Rotarian Geogg Halliay-Pegg (59) and Jon Crook (45). Geoff said: “There will be quite a lot of driving – it's an eight-day trip – but we are very much looking forward to it.”

Geoff would like to thank the companies which have supported the journey, especially Roadphone Communications, of Bourne, for lending radio telephones.

Lions' Ladies member Maryse Brown said: “Once again the people of Bourne have been very generous. We had boxes in Joy of Flowers where people could put things – and they did! And none of its cheap either!

“We are all over the moon it has been collected. It is so sad that they need to have what, to us, are basic products sent out to them.”

50 years ago: November 23, 1973 – A scene at the Langham Jack and Jill Club annual fair in the Institute, on Saturday.
50 years ago: November 23, 1973 – A scene at the Langham Jack and Jill Club annual fair in the Institute, on Saturday.

Bourne Grammar School has vowed to fight any moves to abolish the 11-plus in Lincolnshire.

Staff, parents and governors fear comprehensive status could be forced on the school under new legislation now passing through Parliament.

Local referendums could be held on the future of Britain's 166 state grammar schools as early as next September.

Martin Fisher, chairman of governors, has promised to resist any change to the status quo. He said: “We believe the school is good for Bourne and we will fight tooth and nail to save it. We are not looking for a ballot but if one comes we are determined to fight it and I think we have the support of local people.”

50 years ago: November 23, 1973 – Pictured at Bourne United Reformed Church annual summer fair are Lady Jane Willoughby, chairman of South Kesteven Rural Council, who opened the fair, with the Rev T. S. Kee (left) and Mr R. A Halliday.
50 years ago: November 23, 1973 – Pictured at Bourne United Reformed Church annual summer fair are Lady Jane Willoughby, chairman of South Kesteven Rural Council, who opened the fair, with the Rev T. S. Kee (left) and Mr R. A Halliday.

50 years ago

November 23, 1973

A double-strength peal of bells will ring out over Wittering in the near future.

For three new bells, “Peace”, “Unity” and “Harrier” are to join the existing bells in All Saints' church.

Wittering Parochial Church Council have raised £2,000 for the job. They wanted to provide a memorial of our heritage and to link the old with the new.

The original bells, one is over 600 years old, were being taken down from the 13th Century bell tower this week.

Two of the bells were cast by Toby Norris bell founders of Stamford in 1681.

After the old bells have been returned they will join the new ones in what the church council think is a unique situation. The bells will be hung at two different levels.

People will be able to see the three original bells during the next four weeks while they are left in the church.

Loughborough Bell Foundry are to provide the three newcomers to the All Saints' belfry.

25 years ago: November 27, 1998 – Mercy Mission: Bourne Rotarian Geoff Halliday-Pegg (right) enlists the help of volunteers to load a lorry with essential supplies for the needy in Romania.
25 years ago: November 27, 1998 – Mercy Mission: Bourne Rotarian Geoff Halliday-Pegg (right) enlists the help of volunteers to load a lorry with essential supplies for the needy in Romania.

One garage stopped trading in fuel for the time being, and others started rationing, as the petrol crisis began to bite in Stamford this week.

But generally garages' regular customers should not be too badly hit by the shortage.

Garages acted quickly after Monday's Government announcement of a ten per cent cut in petrol supplies.

Marshall's garage in St Paul's Street, slapped a four-gallon maximum on non-regular customers.

But regulars who pay by credit card or cash will be issued with blue discs to identify them in the rationing period.

And the Northfield's garage, Emlyn's Street, had to stop sales temporarily because they had run out of petrol at that time.

Alexander's in Station Road, will take the same measures as their Spalding branch – the regular customers will get a 10 per cent cut in their normal monthly amount.

But a spokesman for the garage was not sure if non-regular customers would be rationed more than this.

Sycamore's, St Peter's Street, were considering rationing in the future but, earlier this week, service was as normal.

Self service station, Forsyth and Ferrier's, Scotgate, are limiting supplies to four gallons and have put up “regular customers only” signs.

Several of the garages have noticed an increase in people buying petrol in cans in the last week – but this is now illegal.

Stamford police warned motorists this week: “Beware of the petrol pilferers.”

They say every precaution should be taken against petrol thieves when a car is left unattended.

25 years ago: November 20, 1998 – Maryse Brown (front) with other members of Bourne Lions' ladies present their gifts to Insp Paul Elliott who will be delivering them to Romania.
25 years ago: November 20, 1998 – Maryse Brown (front) with other members of Bourne Lions' ladies present their gifts to Insp Paul Elliott who will be delivering them to Romania.

Plans for a water sport playground at the Tallington quarry lakes have gone a stage nearer reality.

The scheme for a commercial centre for sports activities with club, hotel, restaurant, and conference facilities on the 242-acre site, has got the backing of South Kesteven Rural Council.

Their Clerk Mr Norman Kirk said: “The council thinks the plan is thoroughly viable and an excellent idea.”

But the Rural Council can only recommend approval for the plan by Dowsett Land Investment Ltd. The final decision lies with Kesteven County Council, who have already given the go-ahead in principle.

They cannot decide finally until Whitehall give permission for an access at King Street, Barholm.

A similar scheme put forward by Dowsett's in 1967 was turned down on access grounds.

But since then the company have bought more land in the area and it is understood planners are happier about the access.

100 years ago

November 23, 1923

Money From Jumble – A rummage sale was held in the Drill-hall, Stamford, on Thursday in aid of the expenses of St. Mary's Church. Mrs. Scotney, assisted by lady members of the Parish Council, undertook the organisation, and the net proceeds was £22 17s. 6d., which, with subscriptions, total £25.

Railway Workers' Benevolence – A whist drive, organised by the local branch of the National Union of Railwaymen, in aid of the Widows' and Orphans' Christmas Cheer Fund, proved successful on Thursday, 108 taking part. Mr. J. Smith was M.C. and the winners were Mrs. C. Porter, Mrs. Eastwood, Miss M. Noble, Mrs. P. Clarke, Mrs. Welch, Mrs. Pick, Mrs. C. Thrift, and Mr. W. Walker. Guessing competitions were won by Mrs. Lucas, Mrs. Capewell, Mrs. Marshall, and Mr. C. Thift. Refreshments, supplied by the wives of the organisers, were served. The financial result was approximately £3 10s.

Motorist's Escape – A driver in the employ of Messrs. King and Son, had a remarkable escape from injury in a motor smash on Wednesday morning. He was driving a car from Stamford to Market Harborough, and when between Tinwell and Ketton it skidded owing to the ice-like surface of the road. The motor turned round two or three times, eventually coming into contact with a telegraph post, moving it about 18 inches and breaking several wires. The collision telescoped the car, which is a complete wreck, but the driver was uninjured. The vehicle was not insured.

The late Capt. Orme's annual dole of £10 each to three of the most deserving widows in St. George's parish, Stamford, was distributed on Saturday last, the fortunate recipients being Mrs. Coulson, St. Leonard's-street; Mrs. Bishop, St. Paul's-street; and Mrs. Bailey, St. George's-street.

To Keep The Ball Rolling – A successful whist drive was held in the Assembly-rooms, Stamford, on Tuesday evening, when £3 5s. was realised for Stamford Town Football Club. The M.C.'s were Miss Green and Miss Ludlow, and the Misses Eayrs and Goodley acted as stewards. Winners – Mrs. Naylor, Mrs. Lincoln, Miss Sharpe, Miss Goodley, Miss Munton, Mrs. Hewerdine, Mrs. Pond, and Messrs. Hall, Barnett, Moody, Lincoln, and Flecknor. The guessing competition was won by Miss Fitzgerald and Mr. Wright.

The “Army's” Work Among The Young – Major Bernard Booth, eldest son of General Bramwell Booth visited Stamford during the week-end. On Sunday, in the Barn-hill Wesleyan Chapel, the Major addressed the large audience on the work of the Salvation Army. Major Booth is the chief organiser of the work among the juvenile members of that body. He gave a brief outline of the work which the Army is undertaking in 76 countries. Coun. Lloyd Jones presided, and Mr. Arthur Riddington was at the organ. The local corps played a suitable selection.

Shopping Week Postponed – A special meeting of the Stamford Chamber of Commerce was held at the Crown Hotel, Stamford, on Wednesday evening, Mr. H. T. Parrish presiding over a large attendance. In view of the general election, the Shopping Week, which was originally fixed for the week before Christmas, was postponed to a later date. A motion to increase the subscription from 5/- to 20/- was rejected. It was further decided that where possible tradesmen should remain closed from Christmas Eve until Friday.

150 years ago

November 21, 1873

Fifth Lincolnshire Rifle Volunteer Corps – The usual preliminary drills for recruits take place at the Corn-exchange, Stamford, every Tuesday evening at 8 o'clock, and young men desirous of taking part in them can do so without any expense or being compelled to join the corps unless they wish it.

The train from Essendine to Stamford in connection with the 7.10 p.m. train from Grantham is to be discontinued at the end of the present month. It appears that from the day this working commended it has been carried on at a loss to the company, and during last week only one passenger was conveyed by the train.

Stamford Union – Nine Guardians attended the Board meeting on Wednesday, at which the business was mostly of a routine character. A letter from the Peterboro' Board was read, proposing to give 4s. a week to a pauper chargeable to this Union but residing in the Peterboro' Union. As this is one shilling more than the ordinary allowance, the Board declined to sanction the increase, as if done in one case a general alteration of the scale of relief throughout the Stamford Union would have to be considered. The Clerk read a correspondence between himself and the Local Government Board on the subject of medical certificates. When a person falls sick and requires relief it is necessary that a certificate should be produced stating the nature of his malady; and it has happened that a man who belonged to a benefit club could not obtain a certificate from the medical officer without paying a fee of half-a-crown because he was a member of the club. The Local Board was asked whether the medical officer was required, considering the circumstances, to give a certificate to the relieving officer to entitle the man to relief. The reply was considered circumlocutory and evasive; and the Clerk was directed to apply once more to the Local Government Board for a clear and decisive answer.

The Midland railway trolley horse which on Friday week bolted whilst descending St. Mary's-hill, Stamford, on Saturday again ran away, and the man in charge in jumping off the trolley fell and broke a finger.

On Saturday the 5.5 p.m. train from Stamford to Wansford had not proceeded far from the town before the driver felt three shocks in quick succession and pulling up he found that three stones had been placed on the metals at intervals of about a yard. Had they been close together the engine must have left the rails. It is supposed to have been the act of some mischievous boys, who, if discovered, will most likely be sent for trial at the assizes.

A stack of hay in a field adjoining the Stamford and Wansford railway, the property of Mr. J. Middleton, was destroyed by fire on Saturday last. The stack is supposed to have been ignited by sparks from a decayed ash tree that had been set on fire by some mischievous lads.

The new Hall at Ketton, so far as the mason's work is concerned, is satisfactorily arriving at completion, and the general architectural effect may now be fairly estimated. On Monday one of Messrs. Halliday and Cave's carpenters, named Dexter, of Ketton, fell from a trestle between the joists of the bed-room and attic floors, and received such injuries that Mr. Ingram, surgeon, had to be called in.

200 years ago

November 21, 1823

The melancholy news has this week reached the family of Mrs. Hunt (widow of the Rev. Samuel Hunt) of Morcott, Rutland, that one of her sons, who was the owner and commander of a vessel in the South American trade, perished in the dreadful storm of the 31st ult., with his wife and the whole of his crew. The vessel, we understand, with a cargo from Buenos Ayres, was driven on the French coast, a total wreck.

On Saturday last Wm. Bucknell, aged 17, was committed to Falkingham Castle (by the Rev. S. E. Hopkinson) to take his trial at the next sessions, for feloniously stealing six new silver teaspoons, one table-spoon marked J.N.T. (sold by him to a hawker and not yet found), and a silk handkerchief, the property of Ann Barnett, of the George and Dragon public-house at Pointon, where he lodged on the previous Tuesday, and whence, for hospitable treatment, this practised young thief took from two bed-rooms the articles in question. He states himself to be a native of Friskney, near Wainfleet. We last week noticed his detention on suspicion, now justified by the event.

Caution – The family of Mr. Watchorne, at Laughton Lodge, near Falkingham, had lately a narrow escape of their lives from poison. A preparation of mercury for preventing the smut in wheat, has been boiled in the dinner pot, which was afterwards cleaned with great care previous to being used for culinary purposes. Notwithstanding this care, however, such is the penetrating quality of the poison, that on some broth being made in the vessel, of which the family partook, all speedily became alarmingly ill. The person least affected undertook to fetch medical assistance from Falkingham; but even he was taken so extremely ill on the road, that without assistance from some casual passengers he would probably have died; and it was only through prompt and persevering exertions of a medical gentleman that the whole of the party were preserved from death.

There is now growing in a garden in the occupation of Mr. Burbidge, of Barnack, a pear-tree in full blossom.

At Oakham fair on Monday last there was a considerable show of cattle, which went off at improving prices. Fat beasts were much in demand by jobbers for Smithfield. The in-calf trade was at an improvement in price.

On Tuesday night the 11th inst. several sheep belonging to Mrs. Lenton, of Rockingham, were worried, it is supposed by two dogs the property of a shepherd at that place. And on Saturday night last a number of sheep belonging to Mr. Peach, farmer, of the same place, were also worried: twenty-one were discovered nearly dead, and eight others in a mangled state, with no chance of recovery: it is very singular that they were all bitten through the nose. Lord Sondes, with his usual kindness, has behaved most generously to the sufferers on the occasion, and has used much exertion to prevent further injuries of the kind.

Committed to the gaol at Oakham, on Friday last, (by the Rev. Heneage Finch,) Wm. Atton, of Braunston, for trial at the sessions, on suspicion of having on the preceding night stolen a quantity of hay from the premises of Mr. Joseph Robinson, of the same place.



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